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Columbia Pacific Communities Blogs

Preamble

May 20, 2021

Categories : Positive Ageing

Preamble

In My Eyes

April 29, 2021

Categories : Resident Stories

In My Eyes

“Why did you marry dad? He wasn’t as rich as you were.” I asked my mother. Now that I was a married woman with three kids, I could ask her that question! I was twenty six and mom was in her late forties. She looked young for her age. She was slim, tall with delicate features. “Well, I was only sixteen when I met your father. He was a law graduate. Many young men from well-to-do families squandered their wealth or did nothing as they were gentlemen of leisure! I saw a spark of ambition in your dad. I was right.” Mom came from a wealthy family. Thanks to the East India Company official, Francis Day who signed a treaty with the local Nayaka ruler and acquired three square kilometers of land on the beach overlooking the Bay of Bengal. That is how MADRAS in South India was born. Trade flourished. Mom’s great-grandfather started a Snuff Company and minted money. By 1712 missionaries were allowed to enter Madras. So, many schools and colleges were started. And Mom’s grandfather graduated from Christian College and started teaching there. Mom’s dad too was a graduate and took up a job in the Imperial Bank. Mom spent her childhood in palatial bank houses with butlers, cooks, maid servants, gardeners, and chauffeurs. I couldn’t contain my curiosity. “Did you leave my brothers and pick me up and leave with dad with just a suitcase?” “Yes, your dad was frustrated with government jobs. He wanted to start his practice as a lawyer in the city. I believed in him and wanted to fully support him. Can you imagine, we moved into a one-bedroom apartment? It was a struggle.” Mom had the privilege of attending an exclusive girl’s school. The founder of the school had combined the best of Western education with Indian fine arts and sensibility, after she returned from the USA. “I remember how you forced me to go to the same school just because you also had studied there. I am glad you did. I had a wonderful education. We were exposed to Science, Western and Indian Music, drawing and painting, theater and sports. We followed our own curriculum and syllabi.” “And I was thrilled when you won the Gold Medal in B. Ed,” added mom. “And thanks for the gift. I love the Italian coral strand.” I hugged mom. I remembered when I informed her that I wanted to enroll for the B. Ed course, she told me that she would train a cook and send him to cook for the family. And she did. She could not leave dad as he was suffering from asthma. When my husband came to meet me and ask for my hand in marriage I was hesitant as he was building border roads along the India- China border. But mom and dad liked him. She believed he would achieve greater things in life. He was educated, polite, courteous, and his ability to get along with people was his trump card! Her instinct proved to be correct. He became the Project Director of the first indigenous missile project in India and went on to win many laurels in both the army and civilian organizations. My mother while at school was inspired by a Swiss teacher who taught her painting. She continued to paint for forty years and held five exhibitions of her paintings. Initially she refused to sell her paintings saying that she wanted to gift them to her children and grandchildren. Finally, she gave in to my persuasion and sold her paintings. She gave the proceeds to an orphanage and to a home that took care of mentally ill destitute women. She set an example to the whole family. Mom was very talented. She played the Veena, a stringed instrument. She could sing classical Indian songs called Carnatic music. She encouraged me to learn classical dance. She would erect a stage in one of the halls with benches and make jewelry with cardboard, silver and gold paper, sequins and beads. We would invite children from the neighborhood and entertain them! Later in life when I became the Principal of a school, I staged about 20 plays in the school. My love for dance, music and theater was nurtured by my mother. She fought a losing battle with lung cancer. In the last six months of her life, she painted seven oil paintings. She helped her five children, twelve grandchildren, her kith and kin, the orphanage and the home for the mentally ill, till the end. She stood by my father through thick and thin. Her dream was realised when my dad became the Advocate General, a Judge of the High Court and a Law Minister! I regard my mother as a role model, a friend, a protector and an angel in the guise of a mother! In my eyes, mom always knew best…   K.NALINI Serene Urbana by Columbia Pacific Communities

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Soliloquy

April 29, 2021

Categories : Poems by our residents

Soliloquy

Friends,Serenites, Countrymen,Lend me your ears, I come to praise CPC, not to rebuke CPC is honorable, they will keep their word I come to praise Serene, not to revoke Serene staff is honorable, they will do their duty.   One question arises in my mind To be in Serene or not to be That is the question. Far from the maddening crowd, Far from the COVID pandemic I sought refuge in Serene.   At nights, the roaring of the planes Drive away my  doubts and fears And lull me to deep sleep! The chirping of birds awaken me I look out of the window The red streak of sun rise, I watch The green foliage, the myriad blossoms, The trimmed bamboo bushes The placid  pool of water The meditating Buddha, as I behold My heart fills with peace.   I await a new day with renewed hopes My creative urge finds  expressions In dance and music, in art and poetry, .A valuable lesson I did learn at Serene, Some one is more intelligent, more beautiful More talented, more proficient than you are, So I buried my ego, fought the green eyed monster of jealousy, Extended my hand in friendship and love.   As the evening falls, the glorious sun set Beckons me to stroll along, The tree lined avenues Holding the hands of my beloved. As the night creeps in and the stars sparkle And the silvery moon shines I return to my sweet home I retreat to safe Serene, I take refuge in my SHANGRILA.   K.NALINI Serene Urbana by Columbia Pacific Communities

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Zest Beach

April 29, 2021

Categories : Poems by our residents

Zest Beach

It was a fine Sunday morning Twilight announcing the Rising of beautiful orange sun In the eastern horizon.   A group of seniors from Serene Pelican waking up Taking their cars with some Senior friends proceeding to Zest beach 5 kms away   A grand sight await to receive the Oldies with extended arms A big orange ball sprouting from Watery east, trumpeting the Arrival of beautiful sun   A happy meeting of a few Seniors having friendly chat While walking along the Unending stretch of sea shore Watching the graceful sight of sun rise   After thirty minutes of brisk walking Up and down, body full of perspiration Sitting around in the shore sand Analyzing thread bare the day to day Happenings of A to z of world around   As soon as they start feeling The heat of morning sun, Stand up withering away The sticking sand from the body Happily returning to Serene Pelican.   Bad clutters in the brain Peeling off to calm the mind Rejuvenating the life force To joyfully accept the day to day Happenings of good and bad alike   28-04-21. villa 166,Serene Pelican by Columbia Pacific Communities Anna.Mohan-A.Ramasami

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What social biases or stereotypes should we challenge to bridge the gender gap?

March 8, 2021

Categories : Blogs by our residents

What social biases or stereotypes should we challenge to bridge the gender gap?

It is a MAN’s world alright! That is what you are reminded at every stage in life. We distribute sweets at the birth of a baby boy and shed tears when a girl is born especially if she happens to be the second or third girl in a row. I was fortunate to have parents who accepted me as the third girl baby and even considered me lucky because my brother came after three years. And two more followed. Unlike most middle class homes where boys  went to more privileged higher fee charging schools than the girls did, we all went to the same good schools. Like my brothers my youngest sister chose science and math a as major subjects and I chose social science of my own preference. We breached the usual practice of engineering for boys and soft careers for girls.   Then comes the major hurdle in life. Boys see the  likely bride to be in formal settings and accept or reject the proposal. Thank God times are changing and girls are beginning to have a say even in arranged marriages at least in educated families. Yet the man remains the head of the family the final decision maker. Even in the senior citizens residential complex I live in, there is no end to the tales of male domination and female subjugation in marriage partnership. Note that at every socio economic level it is the woman who holds the family together and keeps things going in crises situations regardless of whether she is a home maker only or is also employed. I have often seen men fall apart in a crisis situation while women often gather an inner strength and carry on. However gender socialisation runs so deep that it is the man who is considered the head of the family. I have often  been asked “where is Saab?”  when going to register property in my name or call a carpenter to fix a furniture.   Then come the twilight years. Often it is  the stronger sex  that departs  first leaving the lady partner behind. It is amazing to see how this so called weaker sex the dependent  women come on their own and manage to carry on at times expressing their assertive selves hidden so far. At the same time when it is the man who is left behind I find the widower quite lost finding it hard to cope without a partner.A widow is expected to cope on her own whereas a man is permitted a second and even a third wife if the earlier ones depart. A man cannot cope alone. He needs a companion at every age!   Can we break the circle of gender socialisation? Of course we can and in some families we do. Yet it is often that women themselves are women’s worst enemies because they play an active role in perpetuating the myth of male superiority and that of women being the weaker sex instead of standing up and being counted.   T.S.Saraswathi Serene Urbana by Columbia Pacific Communities Block 4 706.

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What are the challenges you have overcome as a woman to live a happy fulfilled life

March 8, 2021

Categories : Blogs by our residents

What are the challenges you have overcome as a woman to live a happy fulfilled life

A lot of credit for making a fulfilled life possible goes to my grandmother and my parents. Right from my early years my grand mother and mother instilled in me the value of education and the importance of learning to stand on one’s own feet. My grand mother always said” your hands should be held high to give , never in supplication to take” .Whether you marry or not you have to have an independent income. You may have three brothers but never be dependent on anyone. That stood me in good stead throughout my life.   All the same it was never easy. Despite the family support , at every stage I had to run twice as fast as men to be in par, as life showed that it is a Mans world. As an attractive young girl one had to learn early to protect oneself from the groping hands  of men who tried to take advantage of a child’s innocence. Strangely, danger did not lurk in the form of strange men but men known to the family, at times even close relatives .I clearly recall the strategy that my friends and I had while travelling in Chennai buses and trains as students to keep at bay wandering hands of male passengers . We had a sharp edged umbrella handle tucked under our elbows to poke any anatomical detail that brushed against us. That was convenient and sure worked!   In then male dominated  coed colleges after the initial reluctance to speak up in class one learnt to shed ones inhibitions encouraged by teachers and soon realising that we were smarter learners than our male counterparts!At work as a lecturer and then a university professor while there was absolutely no problem with students one had to learn to assert oneself with male colleagues very representative  of the patriarchal world. In order to be heard one learnt to speak up, to speak loud, even yelling if necessary at meetings where male dominance was the order of the day. Yet in mixed group research collaborations this was seldom a problem . The male colleagues in the group,  especially when from abroad, recognised our contribution and respected our views. That toned down the Indian male colleagues!   As for publications in national and international journals the blind peer review system that was followed eliminated the male bias .My work was recognised for its value not because of my gender. Hence name and fame followed . This enabled me to travel all over the world for conferences ,teaching, and collaborative work opening the windows of ones mind. Incidentally one came to realise that male dominance was not India’s monopoly though it was better disguised abroad.   However, one must admit that there was a price to pay for the rewards of independence and achievement. Having seen the male dominance in the family, despite otherwise progressive attitudes, one became wary of the submissive role expected of women in marriage. Hence no partner seemed to suitable and egalitarian enough resulting in a lonely path of ones own choice. Well as a  Jyotish  once commented on seeing my horoscope, “ Good you did not marry. Otherwise because of your independent nature you would have been a divorcee” !   T.S.Saraswathi Serene Urbana by Columbia Pacific Communities . Bangalore 4 706  

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World Food Day Heirloom Recipes From Our Residents

October 15, 2020

Categories : Heirloom recipes from our residents

World Food Day Heirloom Recipes From Our Residents

The fondest memories are made when we are gathered around the table over a sumptuous meal. This #WorldFoodDay, join us in celebrating some of our residents’ favourite heirloom recipes passed down generations. Bon Apetit!   Angaya Podi By Ms Girija Janakiraman, Serene Urbana Eating is a necessity, but cooking is an art. Also, there is no “saying no” to grandma’s cooking. I would like to share one of my favourite recipes called the Angaya Podi that I had learnt from my grandmother. It is a dry chutney powder that is made with highly nutritious ingredients. This powder is best enjoyed with steaming hot rice topped with a generous dollop of ghee (clarified butter) or til (sesame) oil. Besides setting you into a bout of rapture, the podi aids digestion, increases the rate of metabolism, cleans up the bladder and has a great nutritional value. Ingredients 1/4th cup sundakkai vathal (dried turkey berries) 1/4th cup manathakkali vathal (dried sun berries/wonder berries) 1 teaspoon dry neem flowers 50 grams dry ginger powder 2 teaspoons asafoetida powder (hing) 2 teaspoons cumin seed (jeera] powder 2 teaspoons pepper powder 1/4th cup coriander seeds (dhaniya) 1 cup dry curry leaves 5 to 6 dry red chillies Rock salt to taste Instructions Dry roast the following for two minutes on low flame: sundakkai vathal, manathakkali vathal, dry neem flowers, coriander seeds, dry curry leaves, dry red chillies and rock salt. Cool and transfer the ingredients mentioned above to a mixer jar. Add dry ginger powder, asafoetida, jeera and pepper powder. Grind the ingredients into a fine powder. Enjoy the chutney powder with hot rice and ghee. Manathakkali Vathal Kuzhambu By Meera Srinivasan, resident of Serene Urbana by Columbia Pacific Communities The food made by one’s grandmother is always special, not just because it is a mouthwatering culinary delight or a childhood favourite, but also because of the simplicity and love that go into its preparation. Regardless of the dish, I love how my grandma didn’t use any readymade masalas or instant powder while cooking. I think the freshly ground ingredients lent a special charm to my grandma’s recipes. In today’s times where a wide variety of cuisines from around the world are available on a platter, we still crave for the food prepared by our grandma. Keeping this in mind, I am sharing my grandma’s recipe of pepper jeera kuzhambu with manathakkali vathal. This kuzhambu aids digestion, fights stomach infection and improves appetite. Ingredients For grinding 1 tablespoon black pepper ½ tablespoon cumin seeds (jeera) 1 tablespoon black gram (urad dal) 1 tablespoon coriander seeds (dhaniya) 4 red chillies (byadgi variety) Other ingredients Tamarind (lemon sized ball) 1/4th teaspoon turmeric powder Salt to taste 1 teaspoon jaggery 1/4th teaspoon asafoetida powder {hing} For tempering 1 tablespoon gingelly oil 1/4th teaspoon mustard seeds 1 tablespoon manathakkali vathal {nightshade berries) 1 sprig curry leaves 2 red chillies Instructions Soak tamarind in warm water for ten minutes and extract the pulp. Roast all the ingredients listed under “for grinding” on a low flame until they turn golden and grind into a fine powder. Cook the tamarind pulp along with the “other ingredients” mentioned above. Allow the mixture to boil for three minutes and add the masala powder, two cups of water and let it simmer for another five minutes. Adjust the consistency of the kuzhambu by adding more water if required. In a pan, heat gingelly oil and add the ingredients meant for tempering. Once they start spluttering, pour the tempering into the kuzhambu and mix it well. Take the pot off the flame, cover it with a lid and leave for ten minutes. Serve hot with steaming rice and a dollop of ghee. Thippili Rasam By Anuradha Jagannathan, Serene Urbana My grandma’s special Thippili Rasam is not only enjoyable on rainy evenings but can also be used as a medicinal soup to build up immunity against cold, cough, fever and digestive disorders. It also helps to prevent nervous cramps in the calf muscles. The special ingredient, called thippili or pippali (long pepper in English), is a widely used spice in ayurvedic churanams, kashayams and lehiyams. Consumed twice a week in the form of a soup or mixed with hot rice and ghee, this rasam can do wonders for our system. Ingredients For rasam powder 1 cup black pepper 1 cup cumin seeds 1 cup long pepper (thippili sticks) 1 cup pigeon pea (toor dal) For rasam ½ lemon sized lump of tamarind 1 tablespoon thippili rasam powder A pinch of asafoetida (Hing) ¼ teaspoon jaggery Salt to taste 1 tablespoon fresh curry leaves Instructions Dry roast all the ingredients on a low flame, cool and make a fine powder. For making rasam Soak tamarind in warm water, extract the juice and dilute by adding two cups of water. Add salt, asafoetida, thippili rasam powder, jaggery and curry leaves. Bring to boil on a low flame till you get a subtle aroma, then add four more cups of water and let it simmer for a minute and keep aside. For tempering, heat cow ghee in an iron ladle on a low flame and add mustard seeds. Once the seeds splutter, pour the tempering into the rasam. Paati’s Kashayam By Barathy Balakrishnan, Serene Urbana They say that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. However, for my siblings and me, it was a so-called magic drink that kept the doctor away. Our grandmother used to prepare this elixir with a variety of herbs and ensured that we drank it every day during winters and monsoons. Decades later, I find myself on the other side of the table. Being a grandmother myself, I make sure that my grandchildren have this drink every single day. In fact, it is not just for children, but for people of all age groups. I strongly believe that, if taken every-day, it will give you enough immunity to protect you against not just occasional illness, but also COVID-19. Ingredients: 25 grams turmeric powder 15 grams ginger powder 25 grams coriander powder 25 grams aniseeds 10 grams cloves 10 grams cinnamon 10 grams fenugreek seeds 25 grams cumin seeds 25 grams pepper corns 25 grams parsley seeds Instructions: • Grind the above ingredients into a coarse powder and store in an airtight container. • Add one teaspoon powder to one cup of water to make one serving of the kashayam. • Bring the mixture to a boil and let it simmer for five minutes. • Filter and drink the kashayam every morning on an empty stomach. • To enhance the flavour of the kashayam, you may add a bay leaf or basil leaf while boiling it. Kovakkai Avial By Seetha Bharathy, Serene Idigarai You must be familiar with avial – a blend of six to seven vegetables in delectable coconut and curd-based gravy. One afternoon, my family unanimously decided that avial be served for lunch. To my utter dismay, there were no vegetables at home, except kovakkai (ivy gourd/tondli/tindora). And thus, was born kovakkai avial. It has been a family favourite recipe for decades now. Here’s the recipe. Ingredients 250 grams tender kovakkai, split lengthwise 1 cup curd 1 coconut, grated 2-3 green chillies Turmeric powder, one pinch Salt to taste 2 teaspoons coconut oil 2 sprigs curry leaves Instructions Take kovakkai in a pot, sprinkle turmeric powder and salt as per taste. Add one cup or just enough water to cover the vegetables. Cook the kovakkai for 10 minutes and keep aside (take care to not overcook). Beat the curd smooth and keep aside. Finely grind half of the grated coconut along with green chillies. Add the remaining half to the paste and churn briefly (it adds to the coarse texture). Add the paste to the cooked kovakkai, stir well. Add the curd and mix well. Allow the mixture to boil for 2 minutes. Add coconut oil, curry leaves and mix well. Cover the pot and switch off the flame. Let it stand for 5-10 minutes as this lets the avial to absorb the flavour of oil and curry leaves. Serve with rice and sambar or puli kaara kuzhambu.

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COVID-19 and its impact on mental health of the elderly

October 13, 2020

Categories : COVID-19 and senior mental health

COVID-19 and its impact on mental health of the elderly

s senior citizens are one of the most vulnerable groups to the COVID-19 virus, Dr Karthiyayini Mahadevan, head, wellness and well-being, Columbia Pacific Communities suggests a range of ways to address this situation COVID-19, the newly emerged pandemic has woken up the consciousness of human beings to a unique challenge. During these times, there is a lot of focus on how to defend oneself against the offending agent, the COVID-19 virus. In any illness, there is an interaction between the host and the agent, and there is a need for the host to be less perceptive. A spectrum of symptoms and the course of the disease keep changing every day, dynamically. Virus load and reactions to the virus bring about change to the course of this illness. This pandemic has posed a challenge mostly to those who are in the extreme age groups and the ones who have comorbid conditions. Senior citizens and infants are the most vulnerable groups. Hence, our seniors are the ones who need the utmost awareness and protection. Challenges on mental health This outbreak of pandemic proportions has posed numerous compulsions on individuals, viz. indefinite stay indoors or visits away from home and loved ones. Stress resulting from these impositions has led to an array of mental health issues other than the tangibly seen physical illnesses. Since this pandemic is the first of its kind faced by this generation, there are no protocols laid down to overcome the stress caused by this never before experienced situation. The contributing factors adding to this stress are: Uncertainty about the symptoms and course of illness Fear of death Fear of losing loved ones Overwhelming incomprehensive quantum of information Non-availability of beds in hospitals, and in many cases, refusal to admission due to non-availability of ventilators Fear of isolation on being tested positive Consequences of the pandemic on mental health This compounding stress has affected the mind and precipitated any dormant illnesses such as depression, anxiety disorders such as OCD, panic attacks and exacerbated the pre-existing mental illnesses and manifested into aggression, suicidal tendencies and chronic fatigue. How to address this situation A well-balanced diet, regular physical activity and a positive attitude plays a major role. Adequate awareness through the right sources will cause less panic and unnecessary anxiety. Social connectedness plays a major role for those who are not tech savvy. Emotional support through friends will also help. Medical advice through teleconsultations and tele counselling on a regular basis will also play an important role in keeping anxiety levels low. Physically being active also helps in creating positive emotions. Hence, exercises with awareness such as Yoga and Tai Chi have been great tools to overcome mental health challenges.

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Forever young: how to host super fun birthday parties at retirement homes?

October 1, 2020

Categories : Birthday parties at retirement homes

Forever young: how to host super fun birthday parties at retirement homes?

Retirement homes and birthday parties? Aren’t retirement homes supposed to be grey and lifeless? If you thought so, then let us first dispel a few myths, retirement homes are not old age homes. From hosting movie screenings and music concerts to wellness workshops – today’s retirement homes in India help you stay young at heart.    Now let’s look at some interesting ideas to help you host a memorable birthday party.     Host a dinner or luncheon: A simple birthday luncheon or dinner feels delightfully wonderful. Having your favourite people around you while relishing your favourite delicacies is a great way to count your candles and blessings. Many retirement homes like ours offer banquet service to help you host a grand party or dinner. Our banquet halls are spacious enough for you to enjoy dining there with your friends and family. For special occasions, we can design the menu as per your preferences. Decorating the banquet hall with streamers, balloons and birthday decor items will make your birthday bash super fun.     Host a movie screening of your favourite movie: If you are a movie buff, then celebrate your love for cinema on your special day. You can design your invites to look like movie tickets. Have your guests dress up as their favourite movie characters or just catch the latest blockbuster on the big screen at your retirement home. At our retirement home facilities, we can help you host movie screenings of blockbusters as well as classics so that you can enjoy with your family and friends. Follow the movie up with a nice lunch or dinner.     Plan a birthday outing: Visit a museum or a monument, go to your favourite restaurant, attend a music concert, throw an amazing birthday picnic or plan a birthday getaway, there is a lot you can do on your special day. If you are worried about booking tickets and arranging vehicles, many retirement home facilities, including ours, have concierge services for residents. We help you hire vehicles for your impromptu trips. We also provide booking assistance.   Fun games equal fun parties: Who said indoor games are only for kids’ birthday parties? To ensure everyone is laughing, engaged, and entertained, host indoor games. Treasure hunt, ping pong, musical hoops, and karaoke can liven up any birthday party. If you’re worried about organising these fun parties, trained and dedicated staff at our senior living communities can help you with this and a lot more. We hope we have given you enough ideas for your birthday bash and you must now be eagerly waiting to blow out the candles and unwrap the gifts.  

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Fostering friendships in a community living facility

October 1, 2020

Categories : Making new friends in a community living facility

Fostering friendships in a community living facility

For many seniors, moving to a community living can be emotionally difficult, leaving old friends behind and starting over in a new place. We understand that any change in your living situation is bound to stress you and make you anxious, hence it’s important to give yourself time and space to cope with change. Once you move to a community living facility, take your time to adjust to the new environment but at the same time do not feel shy to interact with others.   If  you are moving into a community living facility, here’s what you can do to make new friends:      Spend more time in common areas: Instead of going back to your apartment or villa, spend more time in common areas where you can find people with common interests. There are many ways you can occupy yourself in a community living facility like ours. You can participate in indoor and outdoor games and other activities throughout the day that will give you ample opportunities to strike a conversation and foster new friendships.     Attend events: When you’re moving in, look at the social calendars and see if you fancy anything. Many assisted living facilities like ours realise that making friends in a new place can be difficult. Hence we organise events that are developed keeping in mind the needs and interests of our residents. You will find one or the other activity of your interest. At our community living facility, we organise music concerts, lectures, and workshops that are fun and informative. These places provide you with ways to identify common grounds with other residents. It’s better to catch up with a movie screening with others rather than watching it alone in your apartment.      Break bread together: Food plays a very important role when it comes to fostering friendship. Sharing a meal with others is the easiest way to interact with them and get to know them. Sitting with new people and eating with them can go a long way in developing relationships. At our community living facility, we have spacious dining halls where you can enjoy relaxed meals. Finding new friends while eating will make your meals fun. Those of you who feel like ordering in can have the meals delivered to the doorstep. Some luxury community living facilities also have a beverage station with juicers, smoothie makers  and coffee machines so that you can indulge in your favorite beverage while enjoying with your friends.     Join a fitness class: Joining an exercise class can be a great way to meet people and get to know them better. Exercising is a common interest that everybody loves to talk about. Besides sharing workout tips, there is a lot that you can talk about while exercising. There is one added benefit in this; when you have someone to exercise with, you are more likely to stick to commitment and schedule. At our community living facilities, we offer yoga classes and other physical activities designed by our physiotherapists that will help you stay healthy and yet meet new people. We offer a variety of opportunities for seniors to stay involved in their community, including music concerts and movie screenings.   We hope you find the above-mentioned tips handy when you are moving into a community living facility.

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